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Highlights
Thirty percent of adults in the U.S. fail to get enough sleep each night.

The CDC has called insufficient sleep a public health epidemic.

A sleep illness such as obstructive sleep apnea also can ruin the quality of your sleep.

The AASM is partnering with the CDC to develop the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project.

Promoting healthy sleep with the CDC

Filed in
  • CDC Healthy Sleep

By Thomas M. Heffron  |  Nov 14, 2013
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Waking up to healthy sleep

As the nation’s health protection agency, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tackles the biggest health problems in the U.S. One problem on its radar is our lack of sleep.

CDC data show that 30 percent of adults in the U.S. fail to get enough sleep each night. The percentage of sleepless teens is much higher. The problem is so pervasive that the CDC has stated, “Insufficient sleep is a public health epidemic.”

Why is sleep loss such a big deal? A wealth of research shows that sleep is essential for the health of your brain, heart and body. When sleep is lacking, problems such as heart disease, diabetes, obesity and depression are much more likely to occur. Sleep loss also increases the risk of drowsy driving and workplace accidents.

“Healthy sleep is not a luxury,” said American Academy of Sleep Medicine President Dr. Safwan Badr. “It is a necessity and should be thought of as a vital sign of good health.”

Yesterday the AASM announced a new partnership with the CDC to develop the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project. The five-year project will promote the achievement of the sleep health objectives in Healthy People 2020. Strategic direction for the project will be provided by the CDC, AASM and the Sleep Research Society.

What is healthy sleep? It’s a combination of quantity and quality. You may have poor sleep even though you spend seven to eight hours in bed each night. Sleep can be disrupted by factors such as chronic pain, stress or anxiety, and medication side effects.

A sleep illness such as obstructive sleep apnea also can ruin your sleep. OSA involves repeated breathing pauses during sleep. Left untreated, it increases your risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

It’s clear that healthy sleep is a key to personal health as well as public health and safety. This is a message that will be spread far and side through the Healthy Sleep project.

2 Comments

  1. 1 Mark Guilfoyle 19 Nov
    I recently  had an over night sleep done. My first problem with the study was that the bottom of the bed ( feet) was too high. Higher than my head. Next there was a LED light over my right shoulder that was extremely disruptive to me. So much so I almost left at 1 A.M. Both items were immediately mentioned to the tech but nothing done. Conversations with the physician were not noted. On second consultation with the physician she stated that the light could have been covered.  I saw noting in the report about my concerns. I don't know weere to go from here. Contact me if needed.   
  2. 2 Lynn M. Keefe, MD, FAAP 18 Nov
    Start School Later is a national group of educators, physicians,psychologists and sleep research specialists who advocate for later school start times and healthy school hours. Adequate sleep for students is as necessary to health and learning as good nutrition and exercises. School start time after 8a.m. nationwide would prevent poor health outcomes and improve learning and graduation rates. We commend the CDC for its efforts to promote sleep eduction in school. Join us in our efforts to have education policy makers change to later school start times and healthy school hours! Go to www.startschoollater.com

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